List entry

List entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS

List entry Number: 1392953

Location

CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS, BATH ROAD, OAKHILL

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
SomersetMendipDistrict AuthorityAshwick

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II

Date first listed: 10-Oct-2008

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 505460

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

All Saints' Church has been designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * The contrasting good quality stone work affords the building special exterior architectural quality * It survives largely unaltered and retains its original historic character and features throughout including tiled and mosaic floors, reredos, font and pews * Although All Saints' has a plain interior, the furnishings are of good design; the pulpit in particular is a fine piece and adds interest * It represents the work of a nationally renowned church architect of the mid- to late-C19

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

ASHWICK

381/0/10021 BATH ROAD, OAKHILL 10-OCT-08 Oakhill (East side) CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS

II Anglican church. 1860-63 and designed by the architect John Loughborough Pearson.

MATERIALS: It is built of grey limestone rubble, banded and dressed with Bath stone ashlar. The pitched roofs have slate coverings.

PLAN: The church is oriented north east-south west and has a simple two-cell plan comprising an aisleless nave and a chancel, with a small porch to the south and vestry to the north.

EXTERIOR: The building is Early English in style, with paired lancet windows in the nave and single lancets in the chancel. The west and east windows are of two and three larger lancets respectively. The church is adorned by a single bellcote to the west front. There is a single buttress to both the north east and south west elevations of the nave. The mouldings to the porch are of two chamfered orders and a hood-mould above, and those to the pointed arch entrance have mouldings decorated with rosettes and pairs of chevrons. There are decorative strap hinges to the timber doors.

INTERIOR: The walls are smoothly rendered and whitewashed, and the windows set in deep splayed reveals. The chancel arch has mouldings of two chamfered orders, the inner supported on engaged columns with bell-shaped capitals, and a hood-mould above. A photograph, probably early C20 in date, shows that the chancel arch and the surrounding wall previously had a highly decorative paint scheme which has been painted over. The aisleless nave has a floor of red and black tiles; the chancel is floored with coloured, patterned mosaic. There is a reredos of seven Gothic arches filled with patterned tiles, and an octagonal stone font. The drum-shaped stone pulpit has delicately carved and painted rosette panels and is a particularly fine piece. Other furnishings include pine pews with shaped ends and moulded top rails, choir stalls of similar design with pierced backs, and an organ with decorative pipework. There is an open-truss roof to the nave, and a wagon ceiling in the chancel.

HISTORY: Oakhill owes much of its development to the Oakhill Brewery which was established in the village in the late C18. In 1860 an initial design for an Anglican church was obtained from the local firm of Wainwright and Heard, but this was criticised by the Incorporated Church Building Society (ICBS) and was never built. Instead the prominent church architect John Loughborough Pearson was asked to submit a design, which was duly accepted. Pearson (1817-1897) was a prolific architect responsible for over 250 major works. He worked first as an assistant to Anthony Salvin, and then Philip Hardwick, before establishing his own practice in 1843. Pearson's reputation grew, and he became one of the more successful establishment figures, being elected Fellow Royal Institute of British Architects in 1860 and Royal Academician in 1880. He was architect to several of the great cathedrals - Lincoln, Rochester, Bristol, and Peterborough. His masterpiece is arguably Truro Cathedral in Cornwall (Grade I), which was commenced in 1880.

All Saints' Church was built in 1860-63; the only change to Pearson's design was, at the stipulation of the ICBS, the addition of a buttress on the north side of the nave.

REASON FOR DECISION: All Saints' Church is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * The contrasting good quality stone work affords the building special exterior architectural quality * It survives largely unaltered and retains its original historic character and features throughout including tiled and mosaic floors, reredos, font and pews * Although All Saints' has a plain interior, the furnishings are of good design; the pulpit in particular is a fine piece and adds interest * It represents the work of a nationally renowned church architect of the mid- to late-C19

SOURCES: Nikolaus Pevsner, Buildings of England. North Somerset and Bristol, (1958), 240 Paul Waterhouse, 'Pearson, John Loughborough (1817-1897)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 2004). RIBA, Directory of British Architects 1834-1914 (Continuum, 2001), Vol. 1, 372-3.

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, The Buildings of England: North Somerset and Bristol, (1958)
Waterhouse, P, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: John Gibson and John Norton, (2004)

National Grid Reference: ST 63593 47285

Map


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This copy shows the entry on 28-Nov-2014 at 07:20:29.