List entry

List entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: MOULSECOOMB PLACE

List entry Number: 1381668

Location

MOULSECOOMB PLACE, LEWES ROAD

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
The City of Brighton and HoveUnitary Authority

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II

Date first listed: 20-Aug-1971

Date of most recent amendment: 26-Aug-1999

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 482031

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

BRIGHTON

TQ3206NE LEWES ROAD 577-1/18/384 (North West side) 20/08/71 Moulsecoomb Place (Formerly Listed as: LEWES ROAD Moulsecoomb Place) (Formerly Listed as: LEWES ROAD Cottage behind Moulsecoomb Place)

GV II

Detached house, now offices and social club. 1790, incorporating part of a late-medieval building, altered 1913. The principal front faces east and dates from 1790 when the house was extensively altered for Benjamin Tillstone; south wing of 1913. EXTERIOR: the 1790/1913 building is described first: yellow brick set in Flemish bond to 1790 part of east front, brown brick with dressings of gauged yellow brick to north front, yellow brick in stretcher bond to 1913 wing; roof of slate. 2 storeys; the 1790 part of 7-window range, the 1913 of 2 windows. The 1790 part has a pedimented centre of 3-window range; ground-floor windows cambered-arched except outer ones which have a Palladian window under a round arch in the Adam manner; first-floor windows all flat-arched; the glazing probably of c1900 and consists of casement with margin-lights; stone cornice with mutules, pediment whose shape is echoed in the raised brickwork of the tympanum,and parapet; hipped roof with rebuilt end stacks, and a further stack on the front slope of the hip. The 1913 wing is similarly detailed on east front, with a single-storey, 2-window bay with cornice and parapet. The left-hand return has 2 round-arched openings to ground floor with heads of gauged yellow brick, the right-hand one now an entrance. The right-hand return has a 2-storey segmental bay with 3 windows to each floor, storey band and cornice continued from east front with parapet. Approx 40 metres of flint wall with brick dressings runs from the south-west corner of the 1913 wing southwards. INTERIOR: staircase with curtail step, cast-iron balusters of early Gothic Revival design, wreathed mahogany handrail, and open, arcaded string; the arcading is the section of the curved and stepped underside of the staircase which continues under the first-floor landing; dado rail and moulded cornice to staircase hall. All the rooms off the staircase hall have mahogany 6-panelled doors, the panels decorated with Greek Revival incised ornament; and the room facing the bottom of the stairs has a more elaborate architrave, also of Greek Revival character; the ceiling either end of the staircase has quadripartite vaulting. The middle room on the east front of the 1790 part has a white marble fireplace of neo-Classical design. The ground-floor room in the 1913 wing has a shallow bay to the south with door and windows framed by an architrave and the whole flanked by Ionic columns in antis; facing the bay is an ornate Jacobean-style fireplace. The date 1913 is recorded in stained glass over the south door. REAR WING: attached to the rear wing of the 1790s house is a timber-framed building said to have been part of a larger house of late medieval date. Brick, flint and plaster to ground floor, timber-framing above, roof of tiles. Flat-arched entrance more or less centrally in west front with outshut to left of it; the first floor projects on a bressumer which is only evident to right of the outshut, and the framing consists of close studding and tension braces; 2 small windows with sliding 8/8 sashes; hipped roof; extension to right under catslide roof; left-hand return rebuilt in brick. This building forms part of the bar of the Moulsecoomb Social Club and there are no interior features of interest. The timber-framed building to the rear was previously listed as Cottage behind Moulsecoomb Place on 13/10/52. To the south, and connected to the rear of the 1790's building by a bridge of C19 date, is a barn. The flint extension is an older timber-framed aisled barn which orginates from the C16 or C17 century, but was altered and rebuilt in the C18 when the outer walls were probably rebuilt n flint. The larger C19 "barn" is a later construction, which resulted in the demolition of part ofthe south end of the earlier aisled barn. It appears to have been used as a dairy and grain store. (Carder T: The Encyclopaedia of Brighton: Lewes: 1990-).





Listing NGR: TQ3264406912

Selected Sources

  1. Book  Reference - Author: Carder, T - Title: Encyclopaedia of Brighton - Date: 1990

National Grid Reference: TQ 32644 06912

Map

© Crown Copyright and database right 2012. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100019088.
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This copy shows the entry on 19-Apr-2014 at 11:09:25.