List entry

List entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: PRIORY FARMHOUSE

List entry Number: 1320436

Location

PRIORY FARMHOUSE, BIXHILL LANE

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
WarwickshireNorth WarwickshireDistrict AuthorityShustoke

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II*

Date first listed: 23-Mar-1988

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 309072

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

SHUSTOKE BIXHILL LANE SP2290 (West side) 12/167 Priory Farmhouse GV II* House. Early C15 cruck built open hall; later C15 west cross-wing and 1620 east cross-wing. Stack and floor probably inserted to open hall in 1620. In late C17 service wing added to rear of west cross-wing and in the late C18 or early C19 much of the timber-frame was replaced or cased in red brick. Timber-frame. Late C18/early C19 red brick. Plain-tiled roof. Inserted ridge stack to open hall of sandstone with brick above the ridge. Side stack to parlour cross-wing, and projecting side stack to the later C17 extension at the rear of the parlour cross-wing. Original plan of three bay open hall possibly extending further to the west. The additions in late C15 and C17 now form H-plan. Open hall of one storey and attic. 2 C19 gable dormers. Doorway to cross-passage at rear of stack. Segmental arch to ground floor 3-light casement. West cross-wing of 2 storeys. First floor has a flush frame casement in open boxing and at ground floor a 3-light wood casement in a segmental arch. The east cross-wing is dated 1620 in a sandstone panel reset in the red brickwork of the front gable. In the gable a lunette now blocked, and larger lunettes with glazing at first and ground floors. On the east side wall of this wing the framing is exposed showing typical small framing of height of three panels to the wall which can be compared to the large framing in the former west gable of the open hall (now internal). Interior: Base cruck of early C15 in 3 structural bays. At ground floor level the blades are concealed. At first floor the display truss has evidence of 2-centred arch bracing to the collar. The arcade plate has 2 roll-mouldings. The partition wall at the west end has large framed panels with tension bracing in 2 heights. In the roof the rafters are smoke blackened generally. They are halved and pegged at the apex, well carpentered but with scantlings which are generally smaller than the C17 parts of the house. There is no ridge piece. There are 2 tiers of purlins which are tenoned to the principals, and there is curved and paired wind bracing. The roof is substantially intact. At ground floor there is an inglenook hearth and ceiling carried on moulded main beam. The cross-passage at the rear of the inglenook may be on the site of the original cross-passage. The west cross-wing is of 2 bays. It has an original ceiling at ground floor. The roof is similar to that over the open hall having the purlins tenoned to the principals in the same way and paired and curved wind bracing. The 1620 cross-wing is of 2 bays and was probably a service range beyond the low end of the hall. The roof is of through-purlin type trenched over the backs of the rafters with ridge piece and wind bracing. The later C17 wing at the rear of the west cross-wing has Queen struts to the through-purlin roof. It was originally open to the roof at first floor and heated by the inglenook of coursed and square sandstone. (J.T. Smith: Cruck Distribution: an Interpretation of some recent maps (Vernacular Architecture 1975))

Listing NGR: SP2271490929

Selected Sources

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details

National Grid Reference: SP 22714 90929

Map


© Crown Copyright and database right 2014. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2014. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.

This copy shows the entry on 01-Oct-2014 at 01:22:31.