List entry

List entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: HENRY LUCAS HOSPITAL AND ATTACHED WATER PUMPS

List entry Number: 1303641

Location

HENRY LUCAS HOSPITAL AND ATTACHED WATER PUMPS

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
WokinghamUnitary AuthorityWokingham

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: I

Date first listed: 12-Nov-1951

Date of most recent amendment: 30-Jan-2002

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 41654

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

WOKINGHAM 1886/10/35 CHAPEL GREEN 12-NOV-51 HENRY LUCAS HOSPITAL AND ATTACHED WATER PUMPS (Formerly listed as: CHAPEL GREEN LUCAS ALMSHOUSE) (Formerly listed as: CHAPEL GREEN LUCAS HOSPITAL)

GV I



Almshouses and attached water pumps. Founded 1663 by Henry Lucas, building completed 1667. Brick, rusticated brick quoins; hipped old tile roofs. PLAN: Symmetrical U-plan group with pavilions at ends of the projecting wings, the right hand being the Chapel, the left hand the former Hall. The almshouses are arranged like an Oxford College around individual staircases which each have individual access from the courtyard. 2 storeys and attics. Six tall C17 chimneys with clay pots on rear roof slope of main wing, and single similar stacks to each pavilion. String at first floor level. Bold moulded and modillioned cornices. Windows are all 2- and 3-light wooden casement windows with leaded glazing; 2 flat roof dormers in wings, and in each pavilion. The centre part 9 bays wide, with 3 centre bays projecting slightly. The cornice is carried across central part and round a broad pediment which has a boldly carved stone cartouche of arms supported by a cornucopia in the tympanum. Above the pediment is a hexagonal wood bell turret with inverted curved lead roof and wrought iron weathervane, containing a brass bell dated 1667. 10 panel double central doors in stone architrave, and stone date and inscription panel over, with small floral side enrichment. 2 secondary doors in flanking central projection; with 2 old water pumps adjoining, in wooden boxes, with iron crank handle and spout and floral decoration. Side wings similar, with 2 large, arched windows to pavilions in moulded brick surrounds set in rectangular brick panels. Entrance doors to Chapel and Hall, with circular windows over, on each return face of wings. Entrance forecourt enclosed between pavilions is linked by brick walls with weathered coping and central pair of rusticated brick gate piers with moulded stone caps and balls. Wooden gates with carved upper part and side panels and heavy toprail with central ball and inverted side scrolls. INTERIOR. Chapel has contemporary pews with brass candlesticks, panelling, pulpit, altar-rail and wooden chancel arch flanked by Corinthian pilasters. Chapel and former Common Room both have C17 armorial stained glass. Former Common Room also has wooden dado panelling. Many original C17 wooden doors survive and 5 original wooden staircases with turned balusters also survive HISTORY: The Henry Lucas Hospital was built under the will of Henry Lucas, MP for Cambridge University, dated 1663, for "the erection and endowment of an almshouse for the relief of old men and for the upkeep of a Master to be their Chaplain". On the death of Henry Lucas's executors, in 1675, the Drapers Company inherited the Trusteeship of the hospital. The Charity Commissioner sold the property in March 2001. It has been suggested that Sir Christopher Wren may have been the architect of this building. Henry Lucas was professionally associated with Wren, his father Christopher Wren and his Uncle Matthew Wren in the 1640s but no direct documentary evidence has yet been discovered which directly links Wren's name with the design or construction of this building. V.C.H. vol,lll p.226. B.O.E. (Berkshire) p.310.



Listing NGR: SU8122967391

Selected Sources

  1. Book  Reference - Author: Pevsner, N - Title: The Buildings of England: Berkshire - Date: 1966 - Page References: 310
  2. Book  Reference - Author: Ditchfield, P H and Page, W - Title: The Victoria History of the County of Berkshire - Date: 1923 - Volume: 3 - Page References: 226

National Grid Reference: SU8125167394

Map


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This copy shows the entry on 01-Oct-2014 at 07:05:38.