List entry

List entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: PAMBER PRIORY PRIORY CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, OUR LADY, AND ST JOHN THE BAPTIST

List entry Number: 1092954

Location

PAMBER PRIORY PRIORY CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, OUR LADY, AND ST JOHN THE BAPTIST

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
HampshireBasingstoke and DeaneDistrict AuthorityMonk Sherborne

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: I

Date first listed: 26-Apr-1957

Date of most recent amendment: 17-Oct-1984

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 138734

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

SU 65 NW MONK SHERBORNE 5/17 26.4.57 Pamber Priory: Priory Church of the Holy Trinity, Our Lady, and St John the Baptist (formerly listed as Church of St Mary and St John)

I

C12, C13. Founded by Henry de Port in the time of Henry I as a dependency of St Vigor Carasy, Normandy, and suppressed as an alien priory in 1446, eventually passing to Queens College, Oxford (the present patrons), which carried out restorations in 1843 and 1936. The surviving part of the priory church comprises the Early English choir and the Norman Tower, with fragments embodied in a wall on a line westwards from the south-west corner of the tower. The choir has 4 tall lancets on each side at the east end, a triple lancet east window, and at the western end 2 low pointed arches on rectangular piers (once opening onto side chapels) now walled on the outside to form recesses, 3 containing medieval slabs and one a fine C13 wooden effigy of a cross-legged knight. There are floor slabs, C15 pews; a small area of north wall with fragments of C13 wall painting, and a trefoil-headed piscina. The tower is supported on round arches with stages resting on plain caps, the upper level having on each face 3 arches, the outer containing windows, and a (restoration) open timber frame to support a ceiling and a pyramid roof. An C18 wooden screen separates the tower from the chancel; the other 3 sides to the former crossing are formed by later walls, the west containing a central entrance, the north having doorways in a modem vestry. Externally, the roofing is of tile, with a low-pitched slate roof above the vestry. The chair walls are of flint (partly plastered), with stone dressings, the tower of stone rubble with ashlar features. A stair turret projects from the north-west corner of the crossing, and buttresses occur on the lines of the walls of the former transepts and nave. A C15 font occupies the centre of the floor beneath the tower, and there are several medieval coffin slabs on the east side.

Selected Sources

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details

National Grid Reference: SU 60891 58156

Map


© Crown Copyright and database right 2014. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2014. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.

This copy shows the entry on 02-Sep-2014 at 10:28:31.