List entry

List entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: ARDINGTON HOUSE

List entry Number: 1048188

Location

ARDINGTON HOUSE, CHURCH STREET

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County District District Type Parish
OxfordshireVale of White HorseDistrict AuthorityArdington

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II*

Date first listed: 25-Oct-1951

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 250046

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details

ARDINGTON CHURCH STREET SU4388 (South side) 17/6 Ardington House 25/10/51

II*

Gentry house. c.1720, with some later alterations. Probably by Thomas Strong, Junior, of Oxford; for Edward Clarke. Ashlar stone plinth; grey brick with red brick dressings; complex roof of slate with lead ridges; brick end stacks and ridge stacks. Baroque style. 3-storey, 7-window range, arranged 2:3:2. Segmental-headed 6-panel door to centre, with stone architrave surround with keystones, and rusticated outer surround. Segmental-headed 12-pane sashes with segmental brick heads and brick keystones to left and right bays to centre. Two 12-pane sashes with flat brick arches and brick keystones to left and right. Flat brick band between ground and first floors. 3 segmental-headed 12-pane sashes with segmental brick heads having brick keystones, and brick aprons, to first floor centre 3 bays. Two 12-pane sashes with flat brick arches and brick keystones to first floor left and right. Flat brick band between first and second floors. 3 segmental-headed 12-pane sashes with segmental brick heads having brick keystones, and brick aprons, to second floor 3 bays. Two 12-pane sashes with flat brick arches and brick keystones to second floor left and right. Plain stone cornice at base of plain parapet. Pediment to centre 3 bays, with mid C19 armorial cartouche. Rear: identical fenestration, except glazed door to ground floor centre and C19 wood 2-light wood mullion and transom windows to lengthened openings with flat brick arches and brick keystones to ground floor left and right. Mid C19 wood loggia on Doric columns to ground floor centre 3 bays. Left return: 3-storey, 3-window range. 6-panel door with plain fanlight and round-arched surround having keystone and impost blocks. Round-topped 12-pane sashes with round-arched surrounds having keystones and impost blocks to ground and first floors, that to ground floor left shortened; those to first floor have shaped brick aprons. Flat brick band between ground and first floors, and between first and second floors. 3 round windows with keystones to second floor. Interior: mid C19 wood panelling to hall, with shell-topped niches flanked by paired Ionic pilasters to each side of hall. Early C19 Imperial staircase which rises in 2 flights to half-landing and returns in single flight to first floor. Balustrade of barley-sugar twist balusters. First floor landing has mid C19 wood panelling in Baroque style. Dining room to ground floor rear has probably early C18 Bolection moulded panelling with some later alterations and early C19 plasterwork ceiling of garlands of vines with central shaped moulding. Subsidiary kitchen pavilion, of 1961 by Hugh Vaux, is not of special architectural interest. History: built by Thomas Strong, for Edward Clarke. Estate bought by Robert Vernon in 1833. Vernon made a fortune selling horses to the British Army in the Napoleonic Wars, and presented a collection of paintings to the nation. In 1861 Ardington was bought by Lord Wantage of Lockinge. (Ardington House, by Bervase Jackson-Stops in Country Life: 1981; Buildings of England, Berkshire, 1975 p67)

Listing NGR: SU4329588273

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Pevsner, N, The Buildings of England: Berkshire, (1975), 67
'Country Life' in Country Life, (1981)

National Grid Reference: SU 43295 88273

Map


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This copy shows the entry on 23-Oct-2014 at 06:57:06.